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San Diego, CA freight rates The Port of San Diego offers two maritime cargo terminals, and the community is working to increase capacity to balance export cargo with its abundant import freight. The port specializes in break-bulk and roll-on/roll-off cargoes. Its National City Marine Terminal handles the import and export of vehicles and heavy equipment, with a 140-acre on-dock facility that’s able to hold 120 railcars for automobile loading and unloading. The port’s terminals also handle windmill generator components from Japan and windmill products from Europe and South America, as well as fruit and dry goods. The San Diego County Regional Airport recently added direct service to London and Tokyo to increase cargo shipping opportunities to those markets. One service the region is lacking is rail. San Diego is served by stub-end service from one Class I carrier, and a short line connection to a Mexican carrier. Though new outlets are being investigated, the current Class I service is limited for freight because of the abundance of passenger trains using the local infrastructure.

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Baltimore, Maryland freight rates The Baltimore region is home to blue crabs, row houses and the Port of Baltimore, the nation’s sixth largest port. The port is considered one of the country’s top container terminals and has seen increased container and break bulk cargo each year, thanks to a convenient location and investment in technology. It is 200 miles closer to the Midwest than any other Atlantic seaboard city. Plus, its use of computerized gate complexes, hand held computers and scanners and Electronic Data Interchange have greatly increased the port’s efficiency and cost-effectiveness. Baltimore is served by an extensive highway and rail network, and is home to two Class I and three regional railroads, as well as the Baltimore/Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport.