* Required Fields

Detroit google maps

Detroit, Michigan freight rates The Motor City offers several convenient and efficient options for shipping cargo in and out of the region. Michigan is one of only two Great Lakes states with toll-free highways, which lowers the cost of transporting items to and from Detroit. The city also serves as the busiest border crossing in North America, with more than 10,000 trucks crossing the Ambassador Bridge into Canada daily. The Detroit region is served by four of the seven national Class I railroads, unique to only one-third of the nation, and three of the four railroads have intermodal terminals in the region. Detroit Metropolitan Wayne County Airport ranks in the top 25 for cargo movement in North America. The Port of Detroit is the third largest international gateway in the U.S. It connects the Great Lakes and the entire Midwest to the St. Lawrence Seaway, and imports over 750 million tons of steel annually.

Atlanta, GA freight rates A major transportation hub in the southeast U.S., Atlanta’s mild winter weather and abundant infrastructure makes shipping into the metro area an inexpensive endeavor year-round. Outbound freight can be a different story, especially during the summer months. That’s because the state of Georgia is a major agricultural producer, and most of those goods leave the state. That means capacity for outbound shipping, whether by road, rail, or air, is scarce and therefore expensive during summer. Atlanta is served by the world’s most traveled airport, Hartsfield-Jackson International, which provides access to 22 all-cargo air carriers. The city is also served by two class I railroads and over 20 short-line companies, and is intersected by three major highways (I-75, I-85, I-20). More than 80 percent of U.S. residents are located within a two-hour flight or two-day truck trip of Atlanta. For international shipping via cargo ship, Atlanta is located 250 miles from the Port of Savannah, the fourth largest container port in the nation.