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Phoenix, AZ freight rates With its proximity to California, Texas and Mexico, Phoenix offers access to hundreds of major domestic and international markets. The region boasts 14 airports, including the Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport, which serves as a major hub for southwestern air traffic, making air freight shipping a viable option in and out of the region. Phoenix also offers rail terminals with trailer and container capabilities operated by Union Pacific and Burlington Northern Santa Fe Railroad. The city and surrounding area also offers a sophisticated highway system with interstate routes stretching to Los Angeles, the Midwest and Mexico. Because Arizona exports more than it imports, LTL freight rates into Phoenix are fairly inexpensive. Intermodal freight rates are also reasonable due to the state’s copper industry. On the other hand, shipping out of Phoenix can get expensive due to the state’s agricultural exports. Because crops are grown all year, there isn’t much in the way of seasonal discount rates for outbound shipping.

San Diego, CA freight rates The Port of San Diego offers two maritime cargo terminals, and the community is working to increase capacity to balance export cargo with its abundant import freight. The port specializes in break-bulk and roll-on/roll-off cargoes. Its National City Marine Terminal handles the import and export of vehicles and heavy equipment, with a 140-acre on-dock facility that’s able to hold 120 railcars for automobile loading and unloading. The port’s terminals also handle windmill generator components from Japan and windmill products from Europe and South America, as well as fruit and dry goods. The San Diego County Regional Airport recently added direct service to London and Tokyo to increase cargo shipping opportunities to those markets. One service the region is lacking is rail. San Diego is served by stub-end service from one Class I carrier, and a short line connection to a Mexican carrier. Though new outlets are being investigated, the current Class I service is limited for freight because of the abundance of passenger trains using the local infrastructure.