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Milwaukee, WI freight rates Known for its delectable varieties of beer and sausage, Milwaukee is positioned in the upper Midwest near major highways, waterways and railroads. About a quarter of the nation’s population is within 600 miles of the region. Two interstates, I-94 and I-43, intersect Milwaukee while I-90 passes nearby. Five railroads provide freight service. And domestic and international shipments use the Port of Milwaukee, which handles more than 3 million tons of cargo per year. The Port serves locations throughout the Great Lakes, the St. Lawrence Seaway and the Gulf of Mexico, via the inland waterway system. Its 16 berths can accommodate vessels up to 1,000 feet. Because Milwaukee is located in the more industrial section of the state, freight shipping, especially LTL freight, is available for better prices than other areas of Wisconsin. Outbound freight rates from Milwaukee are almost always less than shipping to the region.

Miami, FL freight rates There are few more prominent hubs for international shipping than Miami, Florida. Miami International Airport is the leading U.S. airport for international freight and the 10th busiest facility in the world. It is also the world’s largest gateway to Latin America and the Caribbean. About 84 percent of all air imports and 81 percent of exports from Latin America and the Caribbean go through this southern Florida region. Miami is served by 84 scheduled and 17 charter air carriers, of which 40 are all-cargo carriers. Both the airport and the PortMiami facility make the region a hub for distribution of perishable products, hi-tech commodities, telecommunications equipment, textiles, pharmaceuticals and industrial machinery. The area includes nearly 1,400 licensed customs brokers and freight forwarders and numerous local and multinational companies specializing in international trade and logistics, trade law and advocacy, finance, importing and exporting. There are also more than 100 consulates, foreign trade offices and bi-national chambers of commerce. Domestic shipping and transport to international facilities is provided by a Class I railroad and a Class II railroad, and truck transport can take advantage of access to I-95 and I-75.