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Houston TX google maps

Houston, Texas freight rates Whether by sea, highway or rail, a major portion of the country’s freight passes in and out of the Houston region. The region is home to the ports of Houston, Galveston, Freeport and Texas City. The Port of Houston ranks first in the U.S. in foreign tonnage and is the largest container port in the Gulf Coast, handling 66 percent of Gulf Coast container traffic in 2013. A recent expansion of the Panama Canal to allow larger ocean freighters should increase port traffic. As one of the nation’s busiest rail centers, the Houston region has a rail network of more than 800 miles of rail line and 21 miles of railroad bridges. Additionally, 10 major rail companies serve the Houston region and 150 trucking lines connect the Port of Houston to the continental U.S., Canada and Mexico. Houston is the crossroads for Interstate Highways 10 and 45, as well as several state highways.

Chicago, IL freight rates Chicago offers an unmatched combination of transportation modes and infrastructure for both domestic and international freight shipping. The city serves as a hub for six of the nation’s seven Class I North American railroads, making it the premier rail hub in the country. The region is connected to six major U.S. interstate highways, with a large amount of truck-hauled freight going to neighboring states. Chicago is also home to O’Hare International Airport, one of the world’s busiest airports. Common items shipped in and out of the region include electronics, pharmaceuticals and machinery. A lot of goods flow between the Windy City and East Asia. Railroads and trucks take international items to and from California’s ports, and airplanes make stops in Alaska between the two destinations. Inbound freight rates are relatively affordable in the city because of larger demand for outbound freight.