* Required Fields

Detroit google maps

Detroit, Michigan freight rates The Motor City offers several convenient and efficient options for shipping cargo in and out of the region. Michigan is one of only two Great Lakes states with toll-free highways, which lowers the cost of transporting items to and from Detroit. The city also serves as the busiest border crossing in North America, with more than 10,000 trucks crossing the Ambassador Bridge into Canada daily. The Detroit region is served by four of the seven national Class I railroads, unique to only one-third of the nation, and three of the four railroads have intermodal terminals in the region. Detroit Metropolitan Wayne County Airport ranks in the top 25 for cargo movement in North America. The Port of Detroit is the third largest international gateway in the U.S. It connects the Great Lakes and the entire Midwest to the St. Lawrence Seaway, and imports over 750 million tons of steel annually.

Austin, TX freight rates As the capital city of Texas, Austin benefits from a prime central location in both the U.S. and in the heart of the Lone Star State. Haulers can take advantage of the region’s location at the intersection of I-35 (the NAFTA corridor) and a network of U.S. and state highways. Three of the nation’s 10 largest cities – Houston, San Antonio and Dallas – are no more than three hours away. Austin is served by two Class I railroads and two regional railroads. The Austin-Bergstrom International Airport handled 155 million pounds of cargo in 2014. The city is within 250 miles of four of the top 11 U.S. ports: Houston, Beaumont, Corpus Christi, and Texas City. It is also within a four-hour drive to Laredo, the major port of entry between the U.S. and Mexico. Like most of Texas, freight shipping in and out of Austin is quite affordable due to the high volume of goods moving in, out and through the state, and efficient due to the transportation network and mild winters.