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Chicago, IL freight rates Chicago offers an unmatched combination of transportation modes and infrastructure for both domestic and international freight shipping. The city serves as a hub for six of the nation’s seven Class I North American railroads, making it the premier rail hub in the country. The region is connected to six major U.S. interstate highways, with a large amount of truck-hauled freight going to neighboring states. Chicago is also home to O’Hare International Airport, one of the world’s busiest airports. Common items shipped in and out of the region include electronics, pharmaceuticals and machinery. A lot of goods flow between the Windy City and East Asia. Railroads and trucks take international items to and from California’s ports, and airplanes make stops in Alaska between the two destinations. Inbound freight rates are relatively affordable in the city because of larger demand for outbound freight.

Salt Lake City, UT freight rates Salt Lake City’s prime geographic location has garnered it the title “Crossroads of the West.” The city directly connects to or is near several major interstate highways: Interstate 80 (east to New York City/west to San Francisco), Interstate 70 (east to Denver), and Interstate 1-15 (north to Canada/south to Mexico). There are more than 2,300 interstate and intrastate motor freight carriers with operations in Utah. The area’s rail system provides interline switching routes for West coast rail transit shipments, and for Eastern and Midwestern transit shipments, with the advantage of not having to backhaul shipments. A new trans-loading facility located in Salt Lake City can accommodate up to 250,000 container lifts annually and is the first major destination and interchange point for Union-Pacific Railroad from Seattle, Portland, Oakland and Los Angeles/Long Beach. The Salt Lake City International Airport is served by 16 cargo carriers that handle more than 550 million pounds of air cargo a year. The city is also a full service customs port city.