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Boston, MA freight rates The Port of Boston is the oldest continually active port in the Western Hemisphere. Its Conley Container Terminal in South Boston serves six of the world’s top 10 container lines and handles nearly 1.5 million metric tons of cargo each year. The port provides efficient truck turn times from pedestal to pedestal of about 30 minutes. The terminal is situated less than two miles from the I-90 and I-93 interstates and the port authority is in the process of building a dedicated freight corridor to separate truck traffic from local commuter traffic to increase efficiency. Nearly 100 ocean container trucking firms offer service through the Port of Boston, as well as dozens of firms that offer international freight forwarding, customs house brokerage and ocean transportation Intermediary services. Logan International Airport is the 10th busiest facility in the country for cargo handling with several domestic and international carriers and two cargo complexes. The Manchester-Boston Regional Airport is another option for air freight. About a dozen railroad companies provide freight service in and around Boston and throughout the state of Massachusetts.

San Diego, CA freight rates The Port of San Diego offers two maritime cargo terminals, and the community is working to increase capacity to balance export cargo with its abundant import freight. The port specializes in break-bulk and roll-on/roll-off cargoes. Its National City Marine Terminal handles the import and export of vehicles and heavy equipment, with a 140-acre on-dock facility that’s able to hold 120 railcars for automobile loading and unloading. The port’s terminals also handle windmill generator components from Japan and windmill products from Europe and South America, as well as fruit and dry goods. The San Diego County Regional Airport recently added direct service to London and Tokyo to increase cargo shipping opportunities to those markets. One service the region is lacking is rail. San Diego is served by stub-end service from one Class I carrier, and a short line connection to a Mexican carrier. Though new outlets are being investigated, the current Class I service is limited for freight because of the abundance of passenger trains using the local infrastructure.